Two Stained Glass Windows; Two Approaches to History

Cathedral Engineer and Confederate Flags Window

Detail of window dedicated to Lt General Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson and General Robert E Lee at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC

Two Stained Glass Windows; Two Approaches to History

The first window is found at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. This church has decided to use ‘the scorched earth’ approach to history. Like General Sherman’s ‘March to the Sea’ during the US Civil War, the scorched earth approach to history is the total destruction of everything that — today — is considered politically incorrect. This could also be called ‘the cultural revolution’ approach to history… 

National Cathedral to Remove Confederate Flags From Stained Glass Windows

June 8, 2016

“Washington’s National Cathedral says it will remove images of the Confederate battle flag from its stained glass windows because, officials say, they are images of hatred and racial supremacy.

“The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde is the Episcopal bishop of Washington and interim dean at the cathedral. She said in a prepared statement on Wednesday that a task force examined the origins of the windows and the impact of racist symbols.

“After receiving the task force’s report, cathedral officials decided the flags will be replaced by plain glass on two 8-foot-by-4-foot windows. The cathedral is working to determine the cost and establish a timeline.

“The windows were installed in 1953 and honor Confederate generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee.”

Source: National Cathedral to Remove Confederate Flags From Stained Glass Windows http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/National-Cathedral-to-Replace-Confederate-Flags-in-Windows-382295071.html

Robert E. Lee stained glass window in the National Cathedral

Windows in the National Cathedral dedicated to Lt General Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson and General Robert E Lee

The second window is found at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Virginia. This church has decided to use the ‘we must always remember’ approach to history. This approach to history is unaffected by political correctness, and seeks to remind each new generation of important peoples, events, and lessons of the past…

Jackson window (detail)

Lt. Gen. Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson window (detail) at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Virginia

Church window illuminates complexity of past

October 30, 2011

“Not slavery, nor war. Not segregation, nor civil rights. Not even fire could destroy the bonds forged more than 150 years ago between a group of Virginia slaves and a Confederate general.

“It remains enshrined in a stained glass window honoring Lt. Gen. Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson that has looked out on the predominantly black worshippers of Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke since before 1937, and is featured in a new illustrated history of the Civil War written by eminent scholar James “Bud” Robertson.

“‘There’s nothing else like it,’ the retired Virginia Tech professor said of the relic and its story. ‘I fought like the devil to keep it in [the book], and the congregation will be so happy.’

“Depicting soldiers camped by a river, the window behind the altar is dedicated to Jackson, and features his dying words: ‘Let us cross the river and rest in the shade of the trees.’

“It was designed and ordered installed by the Rev. Lylburn Liggins Downing, the son of two former slaves who attended a Sunday school class taught by Jackson at Lexington Presbyterian Church in the 1850s.

“In doing so, Jackson, then a Virginia Military Institute professor, skirted laws of the day banning education for blacks, Robertson said, and Downing’s parents instilled in him gratitude for that act of courage.

“The window has remained, cherished by a congregation that bore the humiliations of segregation, yet resisted efforts by civil rights activists to remove it, Robertson said…”

Continue reading: Church window illuminates complexity of past http://www.roanoke.com/webmin/news/church-window-illuminates-complexity-of-past/article_26b3949f-0e73-5632-89cc-587654ad0eb6.html

Jackson window

Lt. Gen. Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson window at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in Roanoke, Virginia

About ajmacdonaldjr

writer, author, blogger
This entry was posted in Character Assassins, Church, Culture, history, Religion, Society, Symbolism, War and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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