US Government, US Army, and CIA torture policy from 1963 to the present day

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

US Government, US Army, and CIA torture policy from 1963 to the present day

The media publicity surrounding the recent CIA Torture Report makes it seems as though torture as US policy is something new, and shocking.

But torture as US policy dates back to 1963. So torture is not a new policy.

And, since torture is not a new policy, it can hardly be called shocking, can it?

Immoral? Yes. Shocking? No.

I was anything but shocked by the recent CIA Torture Report.

Taguba Report

“The Taguba Report (May 2004) is the common name of an official Army Regulation 15-6 military inquiry conducted in 2004 into the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse by United States military forces in Iraq…”

Read more: Taguba Report: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taguba_Report

The Abu Ghraib Prison Photos: http://www.antiwar.com/news/?articleid=2444

UC Berkley Video: Conversations With History – Major General Antonio M. Taguba: http://youtu.be/w9J784PH6Ds via @YouTube

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Torture Memos

“The Torture Memos is a term originally applying to a set of legal memoranda drafted by John Yoo as Deputy Assistant Attorney General of the United States and signed in August 2002 by Assistant Attorney General Jay S. Bybee, head of the Office of Legal Counsel of the United States Department of Justice. They advised the Central Intelligence Agency, the United States Department of Defense, and the president on the use of enhanced interrogation techniques: mental and physical torment and coercion such as prolonged sleep deprivation, binding in stress positions, and waterboarding, and stated that such acts, widely regarded as torture, might be legally permissible under an expansive interpretation of presidential authority during the “War on Terror“…”

Read more: Torture Memos: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torture_Memos

U.S. Army and CIA interrogation manuals

The U.S. Army and CIA interrogation manuals are seven controversial military training manuals which were declassified by the Pentagon in 1996. In 1997, two additional CIA manuals were declassified in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request filed by the Baltimore Sun. The manuals in question have been referred to as “the Torture Manuals” by many US media sources.[2][3][4]

Army Manuals

These manuals were prepared by the U.S. military and used between 1987 and 1991 for intelligence training courses at the U.S. Army School of the Americas (SOA). Some of the material was similar to the older CIA manuals described below. The manuals were also distributed by Special Forces Mobile Training Teams to military personnel and intelligence schools in Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru.

CIA Manual

The first manual, “KUBARK Counterintelligence Interrogation”, dated July 1963, is the source of much of the material in the second manual. KUBARK was a U.S. Central Intelligence Agency cryptonym for the CIA itself. The cryptonym KUBARK appears in the title of a 1963 CIA document KUBARK Counterintelligence Interrogation which describes interrogation techniques, including, among other things, “coercive counterintelligence interrogation of resistant sources”. This is the oldest manual, and promotes the use of abusive techniques, as exemplified by two references to the use of electric shock, in addition to use of threats and fear, sensory deprivation, and isolation.

Read more: U.S. Army and CIA interrogation manuals – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Army_and_CIA_interrogation_manuals

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Torture Is an American Value: Reality vs. the Rhetoric

“I became aware of torture as a U.S. policy in 1969 when I was serving as a USAF combat security officer working near Can Tho City in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta. I was informed about the CIA’s Phong Dinh Province Interrogation Center (PIC) at the Can Tho Army airfield where supposedly “significant members” of the VCI (Viet Cong infrastructure) were taken for torture as part of the Phoenix Pacification Program. A huge French-built prison nearby was also apparently utilized for torture of suspects from the Delta region. Many were routinely murdered.

“Naive, I was shocked! The Agency for International Development (AID) working with Southern Illinois University, for example, trained Vietnamese police and prison officials in the art of torture (“interrogations”) under cover of “public safety.” American officials believed they were teaching “better methods,” often making suggestions during torture sessions conducted by Vietnamese police.

“Instead of the recent euphemism “illegal combatants,” the United State in Vietnam claimed prisoners were “criminal” and therefore exempt from Geneva Convention protections…”

Read more: Torture Is an American Value: Reality vs. the Rhetoric – http://www.vvaw.org/veteran/article/?id=579

George Bush vs Geneva Convention: http://youtu.be/Cg8Cf0OkFLc via @YouTube

CNN Video: Rumsfeld’s Torture Memo: http://youtu.be/9a6M5hB5do0 via @YouTube

GWU National Security Archives: The Interrogation Documents: Debating U.S. Policy and Methods – http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB127/

Re: Violence – Let’s be intellectually honest, for a change… shall we? http://wp.me/pPnn7-24B via @wordpressdotcom

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Fernando Botero – Abu Ghraib

Advertisements

About ajmacdonaldjr

writer, author, blogger
This entry was posted in Ethics, Government, Violence, War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to US Government, US Army, and CIA torture policy from 1963 to the present day

  1. The National Security Archive: The Top Ten Torture Documents You Need to Read

    “The Archive’s posting on the release of the Executive Summary of the Senate Intelligence’s Committee’s report on the CIA’s torture program. The summary is notable for its nearly 3,000 footnotes to specific CIA documents, which show a pattern of repeated factual inaccuracies by the CIA in communications with the Justice Department (to get legal cover for the program), with the White House (including false information inserted in the President’s Daily Brief and one of President Bush’s major speeches), with the Congress (Appendix 3 starting on page 462 provides more than 30 pages of false statements in testimony by former CIA director Michael Hayden), and even inside the Agency itself…”

    Read more: The Top Ten Torture Documents You Need to Read: http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/torture_archive/report.html

  2. “9/11 was used as a pretext, a casus belli to wage an illegal war against Afghanistan. What we are dealing with is the criminalization of the US State apparatus.

    “Jihadists were not behind the 9/11 attacks. The evidence points to a conspiracy at the highest levels of US government including the involvement of the intelligence apparatus…”

    Read more: The Role of 9/11 in Justifying Torture and War: The Criminalization of the US State Apparatus. Senate Report on CIA Torture is a Whitewash http://shar.es/13641U

  3. Bowden: How the CIA may have tortured one of America’s own (and long before 9/11)

    “In 1985, a murky alliance of Mexican drug lords and government officials tortured and killed a DEA agent named Enrique Camarena. In a three-part series, Blood on the Corn, legendary journalist Charles Bowden finally digs into the terrible mystery behind a hero’s murder — his final story…”

    Continue reading: Bowden: How the CIA may have tortured one of America’s own (and long before 9/11) – http://tucsonsentinel.com/nationworld/report/040715_blood_on_the_corn1/bowden-how-cia-may-have-tortured-one-americas-own/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s