The Boston Marathon Bombing – A Teachable Moment

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The Boston Marathon Bombing – A Teachable Moment

“Bomb victim Jeff Bauman, who lost both legs, helped ID suspects from hospital bed.

From the Boston Medical Center, bombing victim Jeff Bauman described the man he saw drop a bag that exploded minutes later. This reportedly helped the FBI find the suspects in video footage leading up to the attack….

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“Bauman was waiting for his girlfriend Erin Hurley to cross the finish line when the man looked at him and placed a bag by his feet. Two and a half minutes later, an explosive inside detonated and tore apart Bauman’s legs, which were later amputated at the knee.”

See: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/bomb-victim-helped-id-suspects-hospital-bed-article-1.1321582

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SUSPICIOUS OBJECTS

Unattended briefcases or bags may simply be forgotten or discarded items – but it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Don’t be afraid to report any of the following:

Bags, boxes or other packages left unattended on buses and trains, in stations, on platforms or on train tracks—especially if partially hidden or in unusual locations.

Exposed wiring, leaks, strange smells or other signs of potential tampering on buses and trains.

Suspicious carry-on items such as large backpacks, gym bags and luggage weighing more than normal.

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IF YOU OBSERVE SUSPICIOUS BEHAVIOR

DO NOT touch or move any suspicious objects

DO NOT use a cell phone or radio in the direct vicinity

DO evacuate the area to a safe distance

DO notify appropriate authorities as soon as
possible

See: http://www.securetransit.org/see-something-2

VIDEO – The Drop Off – If You See Something, Say Something PSA – 30 second – http://youtu.be/qml7obNdmgk

 

“Bauman was waiting for his girlfriend Erin Hurley to cross the finish line when the man looked at him and placed a bag by his feet. Two and a half minutes later, an explosive inside detonated and tore apart Bauman’s legs, which were later amputated at the knee.”

What should Bauman have done when he saw a man place a bag by his feet and walk away from it?

He should have noted this odd, suspicious behavior, especially since this suspicious behavior and object occurred in a crowd of people at an event known to be a likely target of terror, and where the authorities were on high alert for the possibility of bombs.

And it wasn’t only Bauman… the people who observed the second bag being dropped by someone who dropped and walked away from the bag did the same: nothing.

suspicious objects

IF YOU OBSERVE SUSPICIOUS BEHAVIOR

DO NOT touch or move any suspicious objects

DO NOT use a cell phone or radio in the direct vicinity

DO evacuate the area to a safe distance

DO notify appropriate authorities as soon as
possible

Hindsight is always 20/20 and I’m sure no one regrets Bauman’s failure to note and react to this suspicious behavior and object more than he does.

And I’m sure he would be the first to tell us what we should do in similar circumstances:

“If you see a suspicious unattended bag, say something to warn the people around you, evacuate the area, and notify the authorities.”

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“If You See Something, Say Something ™”

“The nationwide “If You See Something, Say Something™” public awareness campaign – is a simple and effective program to raise public awareness of indicators of terrorism and terrorism-related crime, and to emphasize the importance of reporting suspicious activity to the proper local law enforcement authorities. The campaign was originally used by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), which has licensed the use of the slogan to DHS for anti-terrorism and anti-terrorism crime related efforts.”

Homeland Security Begins with Hometown Security

“If you see something suspicious taking place then report that behavior or activity to local law enforcement or in the case of emergency call 9-1-1. Factors such as race, ethnicity, national origin, or religious affiliation alone are not suspicious. For that reason, the public should report only suspicious behavior and situations (e.g., an unattended backpack in a public place or someone trying to break into a restricted area) rather than beliefs, thoughts, ideas, expressions, associations, or speech unrelated to terrorism or other criminal activity. Only reports that document behavior reasonably indicative of criminal activity related to terrorism will be shared with federal partners.”

See: http://www.dhs.gov/if-you-see-something-say-something-campaign

VIDEO – “If You See Something, Say Something (TM)” Public Awareness video – http://youtu.be/6jAV1dbGPB4

 

Another lesson we should learn is this: never use scaffolding as a barricade.

Why scaffolding instead of police barricades were used to partition the sidewalk from the street near the finish line I do not know.

I have never seen scaffolding used for this purpose, and it wasn’t used further down the street where the second bomb exploded.

I was shocked watching the early videos of the first explosion, because people were having to tear apart what appeared to be two or three layers of temporary fencing, which I later realized included scaffolding, in order to reach those who were injured in the blast.

Valuable time was lost because of this, and when people are bleeding to death there is no time to be wasting.

I see no reason for why scaffolding was necessary, except that flags were stuck into it, and I hope we have learned never to use scaffolding for such a purpose again.

The struggle to remove the scaffolding and temporary fencing to reach the victims can be see in this video below:

VIDEO – Boston Marathon Bombings – Clear footage – http://youtu.be/-xiXroQp8t4

About ajmacdonaldjr

writer, author, blogger
This entry was posted in Accident Prevention, Crime, Culture, Government, Law, Media, Society, Terrorism, Violence and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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