Public Opinion quotes me, but FAILS to cite the online source: me

So… anyways… I’m already upset with the Public Opinion, the newspaper of Chambersburg, PA, for various and sundry reasons… and now – today – Matthew Major, opinion editor at the PO – in today’s PO editorial – QUOTES WHAT I HAVE WRITTEN ONLINE AND DOES NOT GIVE ME CREDIT AS THE SOURCE OF THE QUOTATION??!!

Uh, yeah… this is VERY BASIC stuff Matthew. WTF?!

In the screen shot below, which is taken from the Public Opinion website, my words are found ONLY in the LAST quotation presented. Yes, I’m afraid Matthew didn’t properly cite as the source these quotations, below, FIVE online writers IN ADDITION to me:

Matthew Major’s Major Blunder

PO EDITORIAL: Perhaps we should wait for due process?

“Him and all his brothers are in prison, robberies and drugs!”

“Should be a life for a life! Bring back lynching for these situations..”

“Guess all his homies will be posting ‘free steffawn’ now as if he even deserves to live!”

“I say euthanize this loser & save government funds!”

“He is guilty.”

“Can we call it MURDER instead of SHOOTING DEATH? Please? Words are important…”

——

Indeed, words are important, especially in the United States, especially words like “evidence,” and “due process,” and “innocent until proven guilty.”

See: Matthew Major – http://www.publicopiniononline.com/opinion/ci_21656186/po-editorial-perhaps-we-should-wait-due-process

Do you see the “See:” along with the reference to Major’s article, which I just quoted? It enables you to find the article I took the quote from so that you can see for yourself who wrote it.

Without proper citations the reader has no way of following up the quote to see, first if it exists, second if it is accurate, and third that the quote was not taken out of context. For example, Major gives us a quote, here, with no reference as to who said this and where – except that it’s on the Public Opinion’s Facebook page, somewhere, in some article, but without specifics, one could search all day and never find the quote:

“Should be a life for a life! Bring back lynching for these situations..”

Without proper citation, this online writer’s words may in fact have been taken by Major, completely out of their context. The writer could have said:

“The people in my building, very near to where Beam was murdered, are all pretty much saying the same thing: ‘Should be a life for a life! Bring back lynching for these situations’, but I disagree with them, and believe in law, order, and equal justice for all those accused of a crime.”

Without a way to track down this writer’s words for ourselves, we are at Major’s mercy. We are supposed to TRUST him, and take him at his word in this case… apparently.

Citing Non-Print or Sources from the Internet

“With more and more scholarly work being posted on the Internet, you may have to cite research you have completed in virtual environments. While many sources on the Internet should not be used for scholarly work (reference the OWL’s Evaluating Sources of Information resource), some Web sources are perfectly acceptable for research.

When creating in-text citations for electronic, film, or Internet sources, remember that your citation must reference the source in your Works Cited.

Sometimes writers are confused with how to craft parenthetical citations for electronic sources because of the absence of page numbers, but often, these sorts of entries do not require any sort of parenthetical citation at all. For electronic and Internet sources, follow the following guidelines:

Include in the text the first item that appears in the Work Cited entry that corresponds to the citation (e.g. author name, article name, website name, film name).

You do not need to give paragraph numbers or page numbers based on your Web browser’s print preview function.

Unless you must list the website name in the signal phrase in order to get the reader to the appropriate entry, do not include URLs in-text. Only provide partial URLs such as when the name of the site includes, for example, a domain name, like CNN.com or Forbes.com as opposed to writing out http://www.cnn.com or http://www.forbes.com.”

See: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/02/

By the way, the Public Opinion – FINALLY – called the Beam MURDER a MURDER, even linking “Chambersburg” to “Murder”, probably due to the public Facebook stink I have made about it, because it made the PO look really bad. Sort of like today… now I have to reveal the PO’s unprofessional lack of proper citations for online quotation they PRINTED IN THEIR NEWSPAPER TODAY.

CHAMBERSBURG MURDER

See: http://www.publicopiniononline.com/latestnews/ci_21650432/police-man-charged-chambersburg-murder-denied-involvement-teens

Various and and sundry reasons to consider the PO problematic, at best

PO Facebook page – the article Majors took his quotation from is to the LEFT

About ajmacdonaldjr

writer, author, blogger
This entry was posted in Crime, Ethics, Law, Media, Press, Publishing, Uncategorized, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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